Aloe Jucunda

Aloe jucunda

General

Aloe jucunda is a succulent plant.  This type of Aloe plant produces clumps of short-stemmed oval green leaves. The plant has clusters of pink flowers that can grow up to 12 inches tall. This species is usually commonly used as a houseplant.  

Aloe jacunda in flower

(http://garden-photos-com.photoshelter.com/image/I0000Ga9odixC5bs)

Range

Native to Northern Somalia. 

Leaves

The leaves are about 2 inches long and are green. These leaves are covered by white dots. Leaf margins contain small white rounded teeth that change colors with the seasons and are not harmful. The entire leaf has a shiny coat.

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                              http://oregoncactus.blogspot.com/2011/06/aloe-cha-cha.html

Flowers

Makes racemes (flower clusters with the separate flowers attached by short stalks along a central stem) of pink tube-like flowers from June to August. They are pollinated by sunbirds, sugarbirds and bees. The seeds are the main type of dispersal. As they mature, the seed capsules dry until they crack open. Their seeds are light and winged which helps with wind dispersal.

Aloe jacunda in flower

                   http://garden-photos-com.photoshelter.com/image/I0000Ga9odixC5bs

Human Uses

Traditionally used as an herbal medicine to treat wounds such as skin burns with the yellowish liquid produced within the leaves. Aloe also contain aloin which is a chemical that can be used to help with digestive problems and can also be used as a diuretic.

Fun Facts

6,000 years ago the Egyptians called Aloe plants the “plants of immortality” because the many different types of uses. The Aloe species is made up of roughly 95% water.

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